Daylilies, daylilies everywhere.

Didn’t the Daylilies look great this summer? While everyone is familiar with the 2 most prolific ones, Stella d’Oro and the wild orange ones that grow in the road ditches, Daylilies do come in other colors. So many different colors and sizes that, unless you just don’t care for Daylilies, there is one for any garden. Even a single bloom can have 5 or more different colors in it. Now, how do you know which one or ten are perfect for you? You have to think about mature size, bloom time, and of course, color.

Here are some of my favorites, in no particular order:

Black Eyed Susan

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Maroon and gold. If you are a University of MN graduate, shouldn’t you have this in your garden? 26″ tall with 4 1/2″ blooms.

Hyperion

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This 40″ Daylily is one of the tallest we carry. The 5″ canary yellow flowers are very fragrant and stay open for 16 hours!

Primal Scream (PW)

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36″ tall with 7 1/2″ uniquely shaped tangerine orange  flowers.

Ruby Spider (PW)

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34″ tall with enormous 9″ ruby red blooms.

Desert Flame

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I couldn’t get the color to photograph quite right. It really is red-orange. It is so very pretty. It gets about 36″ tall and the flowers are 5 1/2″ across.

Inwood

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Look at that edge and that eye! Inwood is about 25″ tall with 6 1/2″ blooms.

Strawberry Candy

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Isn’t it lovely? An extended bloom variety, the 4 1/2″ flowers stay open for 16 hours!

Keep in mind when you are picking out your daylilies that re-blooming is dependent on the climate. With our short growing season, re-bloom isn’t guaranteed but can happen if we have the right combination of a mild winter and an early spring. That said, Stella d’Oro is the most prolific bloomer that I know of. In general, removing the seedpods will improve flowering the following season. Daylilies are hardy to zone 3 and can handle a wide range of soil conditions including areas near roadways and walnut trees. Although they do prefer full sun, they will also tolerate partial shade.

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Written by

Cathy Maxson is Sargent's Gardens Annual and Perennial Growing manager. In addition to making sure Sargent's grown plants thrive, she enjoys growing in her own garden, canning fruits and vegetables, traveling, and walking her dogs.